What to Expect During a Sonohysterography

A baseline transvaginal ultrasound procedure is usually performed first to view the endometrium, or the lining of the uterus, including its thickness and any associated ovarian abnormality.

Transvaginal ultrasound is performed very much like a gynecologic exam and involves the insertion of the transducer into the vagina after you empty your bladder. The tip of the transducer is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test.

A protective cover is placed over the transducer, lubricated with a small amount of gel, and then inserted into the vagina. Only two to three inches of the transducer end are inserted into the vagina. The images are obtained from different orientations to get the best views of the uterus and ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed while you lie on your back and have your feet in stirrups similar to a gynecologic exam.

Doppler sonography also can be performed through the transvaginal transducer.

Sonohysterography is then performed as a more in-depth investigation of the abnormalities and their potential causes. Determining the locations of certain abnormalities, such as fibroids or polyps, can be important when establishing a treatment or management strategy for a patient's particular condition.

Following the baseline exam, the transvaginal probe will be removed, and a sterile speculum will be inserted as you lie on your back with your knees bent or your feet in stirrups. The cervix will be cleansed, and a catheter will be inserted into the uterine cavity. Once the catheter is in place, the speculum will be removed, and the transvaginal probe will be re-inserted into the vaginal canal. Sterile saline will then be injected through the catheter into the uterine cavity as ultrasound is being performed.

Time Consideration

This ultrasound examination is usually completed within 30 minutes.

Other Factors

Most ultrasound examinations are painless, fast and easy.

With transvaginal ultrasound, although the examination is often performed to look for a cause of pelvic pain, the sonogram itself should not be painful or significantly increase your discomfort. A vaginal sonogram is usually more comfortable than a manual gynecologic examination.

During the sonohysterogram, you may feel occasional cramping as a result of the introduction of the saline. Over-the-counter medication should be sufficient to minimize any discomfort associated with the procedure. You may have vaginal spotting for a few days after the procedure, which is normal.

If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, you may actually hear pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the blood flow is monitored and measured.

 

After an ultrasound exam, you should be able to resume your normal activities within a few hours.